FLEXICON

SPIRITED

Spirited Shiftschool transformation

SPIRITED

\ ˈspir-ə-təd \

A DEFINITION:

According to Merriam Webster, the term spirited describes people who are full of energy, animation, or courage. In other words, they have the right spirit to drive things forward. But where does the courage to get started and the energy to stick with it come from?

The hasty answer to this question would be: you have it or you don’t. On closer inspection, we realize that these two categories are not immutable character traits, but attitudes toward the unknown. Within my comfort zone, I need neither courage nor energy. However, I need a lot of courage and energy whenever I consciously want to change.

Therefore, spiritedness is needed at the beginning of a change process. You need the famous first step to take the initiative. When you start running, you become more courageous over time. It is illusory to completely block out fear, it will always be there. We have to accept that. And we must make sure that fear does not force us to turn back. Courage is when you do it anyway.

Once you have set yourself in motion, the ideas will follow. It is a myth that you must have a precise idea of what you want to achieve before you start your journey. Innovation is always a process. The ideas come as you go.

Science confirms this. Psychologist Angela Duckworth has demonstrated many times in her research that the secret to outstanding performance is not so much intelligence and talent, but a special blend of passion and perseverance, which she calls “grit.” When we develop passion for something and consciously move into action, vague ideas become measurable experiences that, whether positive or negative, make us bolder and bolder over time. That’s why Spirited is the first of 5 steps within the SHIFT® Framework.

Open the FLEXICON and discover more key principles of transformation.

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FLEXICON

SERENDIPITY

SERENDIPITY \ ˌser-ən-ˈdi-pə-tē \ A DEFINITION: According to a British translation company, serendipity is one of the ten most difficult English words to…
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